Harley-Davidson's 'connected vehicle' patent could make group rides easier, safer

Ducati has said that it will offer adaptive cruise control on at least one 2020 model, and Bosch already has an off-the-shelf system on offer to other OEMs.

Harley-Davidson’s recent patent filing shows a system where each motorcycle has a transceiver and unique identity. In a group ride, a following rider could ‘lock on’ to a leader, and his motorcycle would cue off the leader’s.

Harley-Davidson’s recent patent filing shows a system where each motorcycle has a transceiver and unique identity. In a group ride, a following rider could ‘lock on’ to a leader, and his motorcycle would cue off the leader’s.

But Harley-Davidson may have one-upped them by patenting a system that incorporates both adaptive cruise control and automated speed control for group riding.

The patent application shows that Harley-Davidson has considered problems such as how a group of riders would interact with other traffic.

The patent application shows that Harley-Davidson has considered problems such as how a group of riders would interact with other traffic.

Harley-Davidson has also filed patents recently that confirm it’s also working on Automatic Emergency Braking systems.

Harley-Davidson has also filed patents recently that confirm it’s also working on Automatic Emergency Braking systems.

So far, I’ve only seen evidence that Harley’s working on ‘longitudinal’ rider assistance, and not any auto-steer systems. In the motorcycle sector, we’re still a few years behind the best automotive systems.

That said, this is a big step up from the rudimentary connected-vehicle tech on previewed on Harley-Davidson’s Livewire, and the first peer-to-peer networking system that I’ve seen for motorcycles.